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Method for a nano-level thermal attachment system

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010799D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-22
Document File: 5 page(s) / 297K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a nano-level thermal attachment system. Benefits include improved thermal performance, improved electrical performance, and improved reliability.

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Method for a nano-level thermal attachment system

Disclosed is a method for a nano-level thermal attachment system. Benefits include improved thermal performance, improved electrical performance, and improved reliability.

Background

        � � � � � Microprocessors dissipate a great deal of heat and require a solid thermal bond to their heatsinks. For mobile environments, the strong vibrations tend to break the thermal grease that bonds the silicon to the heatsink metal. In addition, the general chemical-aging process of thermal interface materials (TIMs) leads to decreased performance over time. This degeneration is becoming a big issue due to the thermal demands of the processors and the cost/reliability of TIMs. Systems must work in temperatures approaching 100ºC.

        � � � � � Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a form of matter with remarkable properties. An ordered array of CNTs has been grown from seeded sites by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, see Figure 1). The two most relevant properties of CNTs are their enormous thermal conductivity (~5X that of a diamond) and their strong elastic properties. While CNTs have strong molecular attraction (called Van der Waal’s force), their elastic strength tends to repel surfaces. An important aspect of CNTs is that chemical groups can be covalently bonded to their sides and tips (see Figure 2).

        � � � � � Intra-chip heating occurs when hotspots result from circuitry and/or activity on various parts of the chip. These hotspots tend to heat up other parts of the chip either directly (neighboring regions) or indirectly through the heatsink. Increased temperature can reduce electrical performance.

General description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is a nano-level thermal attachment system using CNTs. Several techniques can achieve attachment:

•        � � � � Etching of nano-patterns onto the backside of silicon chips, enabling them to stick to a polished heatsink and form a durable bond

•        � � � � Depositing nano-patterns of an organic or inorganic material on the backside of silicon chips

•        � � � � Deploying carbon nanotubes, compensatin...