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SYSTEM FOR ENABLING AUDIO DELIVERY OF INTERNET CONTENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010871D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-29
Document File: 17 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Saida Herzi: INVENTOR

Related Documents

6,415,021: PATENT [+2]

Abstract

Systems and methods for selecting and retrieving SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) based content from the internet and intranet and delivering such content to the telephone. A method for use in a computer system having a processor, access to the internet, and a modem connected to the Public Switched Telephone Network. The method further includes a database for saving parent-child relationships of the items in the SGML document. This method further includes identifying unique items on the document. The method further includes embedding software components into the web browser.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 12% of the total text.

SYSTEM FOR ENABLING AUDIO DELIVERY OF INTERNET CONTENT

Inventor:

Saida Herzi

2004 Inverness Drive

Round Rock, Texas  78681

 

SYSTEM FOR ENABLING AUDIO DELIVERY OF INTERNET CONTENT

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to a method to configure and voice enable content from any website and furthermore to deliver and access such content from any telephony device.

BACKGROUND

Voice access to e-mail and web content has been available in the market place for sometime. Available solutions are server based solutions that provide a toll free telephone number to access desired content.

Such a solution can be viewed as a bridge between the Internet (IP-Internet Protocol) and the telephone networks (PSTN-Public Switched Telephone Network). FIGURE 1 illustrates this solution. The paying customer makes a telephone call to special server that is voice enabled. This server access’ the internet to update its data in real-time (i.e. Stock quotes and weather).

The bridge or the IVR (Interactive Voice Response Server) FIGURE 1 is the special server that connects the caller to the internet. The IVR speech enables and delivers the content to the telephone.

The solution discussed above is considered to be a Pull solution, since the caller must initiate the request for the real-time data. Slight modifications are made to the solution to enable a Push implementation. In this case, data is continuously monitored for pre-defined rules (i.e. Stock falls bellow 10% of purchase price) and the server initiates a call, email or an electronic page to the customer requesting the alert.

The server based solution was necessary due to two reasons; First, the lack of widespread availability of IP (internet) connections and secondly, the availability of software and hardware to deliver the voice recognition and text to speech engines.

Until recently almost all home owners that wished to connect to the internet needed to make an analog call through their modem (PSTN connection) to a server that provided the connection to the Internet (IP). However, DSL and Cable Modem are providing IP connections directly to the homes.

Advancements in processor technology have enabled Personal Computers to easily perform the complex calculations needed for voice recognition and text to speech. In fact, newer operating systems such as Windows XP from Microsoft have built-in Speech Recognition and Text to Speech Engines.

Given that countless homes have direct access to the internet via High Speed connections and existing personal computers have the necessary software and hardware to enable speech, it then becomes possible for the personal computer to deliver the same functionality as the above mentioned dedicated commercial server (FIGURE 1).

FIGURE 2 shows the PC as the “bridge” between the IP and PSTN worlds.

A clear advantage of using PC based solutions is cost. At minimum commercial Voice-enabling solutions must recoup the cost of the toll free 800 call. However, the PC based solution allows...