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Method to support ARP with an ARP reply message during OS-absent states without waking up the system

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010892D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to support address resolution protocol (ARP) with an ARP reply message during operating-system-absent states without waking up the system. Benefits include improved power consumption and improved performance.

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Method to support ARP with an ARP reply message during OS-absent states without waking up the system

Disclosed is a method to support address resolution protocol (ARP) with an ARP reply message during operating-system-absent states without waking up the system. Benefits include improved power consumption and improved performance.

Background

      Conventionally, ARP packets are sent by the network router to a corresponding media access controller (MAC) address for a destination Internet Protocol (IP) address. The MAC address is also known as a physical address, individual address, or Ethernet address. Whenever a packet is forwarded over the Internet, only the IP address is known by the sending device. The source device is not required to know the MAC address of the destination (end station). The packet reaches the router that is connected to the end station using IP routing methods. The router maintains an internal cache that stores IP and MAC pairs. However, they are periodically flushed for various reasons. If the IP-MAC address pair is not present in the internal cache, the router sends ARP broadcast request packets to all connected end stations. Only one end station that has the matching IP address sends the ARP response (reply) packet with its MAC address. The router then updates the cache with this new IP-MAC address pair.

             

              Conventionally, when a PC south-bridge chip receives an ARP message that matches the system’s IP address, the chip wakes u...