Browse Prior Art Database

Solar (Infrared) Reflective Paints and Primers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010923D
Publication Date: 2003-Jan-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 136K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Vehicle thermal loads in sunny climates are strongly influenced by the absorption of solar thermal energy. Reduction of the absorptivity in the near infrared spectrum would decrease vehicle soak temperatures, reduce air conditioning power consumption and not affect the vehicle color (visible spectrum radiation properties). The literature [1] indicates that paint formulations with carbon-black pigment removed can be made to be reflective to the near infrared. Figure 1 demonstrates the spectral absorptivity changes attainable with this technique with Solar Reflective Black (SRB) paint free of carbon-black pigment

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Solar (Infrared) Reflective Paints and Primers

Vehicle thermal loads in sunny climates are strongly influenced by the absorption of solar thermal energy.  Reduction of the absorptivity in the near infrared spectrum would decrease vehicle soak temperatures, reduce air conditioning power consumption and not affect the vehicle color (visible spectrum radiation properties).  The literature [1] indicates that paint formulations with carbon-black pigment removed can be made to be reflective to the near infrared.  Figure 1 demonstrates the spectral absorptivity changes attainable with this technique with Solar Reflective Black (SRB) paint free of carbon-black pigment.

Figure 1. Primer effect on the absorptivity of solar reflective black automotive coating (from Picket [1]).

Experiments were conducted with existing automotive basecoats and primers applied to cold rolled steel.  The total solar absorptivity was measured utilizing a solar spectrum light and filter set and measurement of the thermal energy balance. No special paint formulations free of carbon-black pigment were developed or tested. A maximum absorptivity reduction of 0.067 was obtained with standard primer/basecoats in the experiments conducted. Average absorptivity reductions of 4% were achieved for basecoat paints with less than 5% carbon-black pigments by mass by simply using a white primer coating. It is important to note that slight visible color/shade change was detectable in these experiments.

Numerical simulations indicate that decreasing the solar absorptivity of the painted surfaces reduces the vehicle...