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Multi-Layer Capacitor with Less Grains Stacked Up Per Layer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000010964D
Publication Date: 2003-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a smaller number of stacked up grains per dielectric layer in MLCCs. Benefits include thinner layers and a higher overall capacitance.

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Multi-Layer Capacitor with Less Grains Stacked Up Per Layer

Disclosed is a method that uses a smaller number of stacked up grains per dielectric layer in MLCCs. Benefits include thinner layers and a higher overall capacitance.

Background

Currently, capacitor MLCC suppliers try to decrease dielectric thickness by decreasing grain size while keeping the number of stacked up grains per layer the same (see Figure 1). This is accomplished in order to maintain a reliable capacitor which can be used for multiple applications, including high voltage circuitry.� As the number of grain boundaries in the electrical path between the top and bottom electrodes increases, the reliability increases; the grain boundaries are specially doped to ensure low leakage current. The present MLCCs have an expected life-time of over 12,000 years, for operating conditions of 1.8 Vdc and 100 °C. These packages are expected to have a reliability of no more than 1% failure rate at 7 years at 90% confidence, and no more than a 3% failure rate at 10 years at 90% confidence, under operating conditions. Clearly, the reliability of the present MLCCs is an over-kill.

General Description

The disclosed method reduces the number of stacked up grains per dielectric layer, so that the dielectric thickness goes down, and the capacitance goes up (capacitance is inversely proportional to dielectric thickness). See Figure 1. This reduces the number of MLCCs on the package by a factor of two. This requires less research...