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Method and Apparatus for Emergency Mobile Location

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011043D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Feb-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Feb-11
Document File: 6 page(s) / 543K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jon St. Clair: AUTHOR

Abstract

This paper describes an emergency mobile location method which obtains and uses the unique cellular coding information of an emergency 911 call to configure an emergency mobile location device, which assists a response team in locating the subscriber’s position. This paper also describes the unique cellular hardware device that embodies the functionality of a conventional subscriber with existing direction and range finding technologies.

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Method and Apparatus for Emergency Mobile Location

By Jon St. Clair

With Acknowledgements to: Joseph Bailey and William Alexander Jr.
who participated in the original submission.


ABSTRACT�

This paper describes an emergency mobile location method which obtains and uses the unique cellular coding information of an emergency 911 call to configure an emergency mobile location device, which assists a response team in locating the subscriber’s position. This paper also describes the unique cellular hardware device that embodies the functionality of a conventional subscriber with existing direction and range finding technologies.

BACKGROUND

Cellular 911 systems are well known.� The basic FCC's wireless 911 rules require wireless carriers to transmit all 911 calls to a public safety answering point and apply to all cellular licensees, broadband Personal Communications Service (PCS) licensees, and certain Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) licensees.

The 911 rules seek to improve the reliability of wireless 911 services and to provide emergency services personnel with location information enabling them to quickly find and provide assistance to wireless 911 callers.

Many wireless 911 calls are made by "good Samaritans" reporting traffic accidents, crimes, or other emergencies.� Prompt delivery of 911 calls to public safety organizations with quick and accurate response capabilities benefits the public at large by promoting safety of life and property.

Signal homing methods by discerning source distance and direction are also well known.� The methods are especially common when used with a reference beacon transmitter.�

A typical application of this method is the location of stolen vehicles equipped with a beacon transmitter.� The beacon transmitter activates either from a vehicle alarm system or remotely when the driver discovers the vehicle missing.

PROBLEM

Current cellular location methods use data acquired by the base transceiver station or basic system information such as Cell ID and Sector ID.� This data can deviate from the actual location of a cellular call due to reflection of electromagnetic waves, low resolution due to cell sector size and a finite number of antennas at the site, etc.� Even if such faults do not occur, locations calculated by such methods as terrestrial triangulation, angle of approach of the signal, and time delays of the signal still yield a standard deviation which has been described as the size of two football fields or larger.

Wireless carriers are required to provide Automatic Location Identification (ALI) as part of Phase II E911 implementation beginning October 1, 2001.� Originally, the FCC's rules envisioned that carriers would need to deploy network-based ALI technologies, but difficulties have shifted the emphasis to handset-based technologies.

In the past several years, there have been significant advances in subscriber station based location technologies, such as ONSTAR but the advances do not address the increased...