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One-Piece Spring Clip for the Common Enabling Kit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011178D
Publication Date: 2003-Feb-12
Document File: 5 page(s) / 368K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a one-piece spring clip to create pressure on the thermal interface material (TIM) between the CPU’s integrated heat spreader (IHS) and the heat sink base of Nocona form factor processors. Benefits include a reduction in material costs, and a design that can adapt to a variety of OEM/ODM business models.

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One-Piece Spring Clip for the Common Enabling Kit

Disclosed is a method that uses a one-piece spring clip to create pressure on the thermal interface material (TIM) between the CPU’s integrated heat spreader (IHS) and the heat sink base of Nocona form factor processors. Benefits include a reduction in material costs, and a design that can adapt to a variety of OEM/ODM business models.

Background

Currently, common enabling kit (CEK) spring clips require a back plate to work, which makes them non-compliant with SSI standards.

General Description

Figure 1 shows the one-piece spring clip within the context of a new CEK heat sink assembly. In this new assembly, the spring is pre-attached to the motherboard via the board finger clips (see Figures 2 through 4). The board is placed in the system and the bosses on the spring attach to the top of the chassis standoffs. The four embosses on the clip are used as “key-in” and cradling features to connect the clip to the chassis standoffs. Four additional standoffs are screwed into the chassis standoffs, which clamp the clip to the chassis. These standoffs are press fit into the base of the heat sink. Due to this integration, the assembly is simplified (see Figure 1).

 

As stated above, spring does not attach to the chassis, it attaches to the board and rests on the chassis standoffs.  Areas on the MB near the CPU socket locations are deflected upward by the cantilever beam feature located beneath the clip. The four additional stand...