Browse Prior Art Database

A REMOTE MULTIMEDIA COMPUTER TERMINAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011264D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Feb-13
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Feb-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a remote multimedia computer terminal system that is compatible with the cable television network. The audio and video output signals are frequency-division multiplexed with other cable television signals. The computer output signals can be displayed on either a regular computer monitor or a television set remotely. The signals from computer input devices are transmitted back to the computer via the same cable.

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A REMOTE MULTIMEDIA COMPUTER TERMINAL

  Disclosed is a remote multimedia computer terminal system that is compatible with the cable television network. The audio and video output signals are frequency-division multiplexed with other cable television signals. The computer output signals can be displayed on either a regular computer monitor or a television set remotely. The signals from computer input devices are transmitted back to the computer via the same cable. The computer monitor can be used to view normal cable television channels also.

Because the data rate of video signals coming out of a computer is generally high, the length of the cable connecting between a computer and a monitor can not be extended to more than a few hundred feet. A method intended to solve this cable length limitation on video signals is disclosed herein. An exemplary scheme of the remote multimedia computer terminal is shown in Fig. 1. The computer output signals are frequency-division multiplexed with incoming cable television signals after a set of notch filters at the connection point to prevent the computer signals leaking out the local domain. The combined signals are then split into several branches as commonly done in the cable television network. Three typical setups at the receiving end are illustrated in the figure. The first one uses a cable television converter (called set-top box sometimes) and a normal television set. The second one is a cable-television ready television...