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Guidelines for the Use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) within IETF Protocols (RFC3470)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011361D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Feb-14
Document File: 29 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

S. Hollenbeck: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a framework for structuring data. While it evolved from Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) -- a markup language primarily focused on structuring documents -- XML has evolved to be a widely-used mechanism for representing structured data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 4% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                      S. Hollenbeck

Request for Comments: 3470                                VeriSign, Inc.

BCP: 70                                                          M. Rose

Category: Best Current Practice             Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.

                                                             L. Masinter

                                              Adobe Systems Incorporated

                                                            January 2003

       Guidelines for the Use of Extensible Markup Language (XML)

                         within IETF Protocols

Status of this Memo

   This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the

   Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for

   improvements.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a framework for structuring

   data.  While it evolved from Standard Generalized Markup Language

   (SGML) -- a markup language primarily focused on structuring

   documents -- XML has evolved to be a widely-used mechanism for

   representing structured data.

   There are a wide variety of Internet protocols being developed; many

   have need for a representation for structured data relevant to their

   application.  There has been much interest in the use of XML as a

   representation method.  This document describes basic XML concepts,

   analyzes various alternatives in the use of XML, and provides

   guidelines for the use of XML within IETF standards-track protocols.

Table of Contents

   Conventions Used In This Document  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2

   1.    Introduction and Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2

         1.1   Intended Audience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3

         1.2   Scope  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3

         1.3   XML Evolution  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3

         1.4   XML Users, Support Groups, and Additional

               Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4

   2.    XML Selection Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4

   3.    XML Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5

Hollenbeck, et al.       Best Current Practice                  [Page 1]

RFC 3470               XML within IETF Protocols            January 2003

   4.    XML Use Considerations and Recommendations . . . . . . . . .  7

         4.1 ®..