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A method of digital voting based on reception times of the packets to be voted

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011398D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Feb-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Feb-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Mark Pevec: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a digital radio network where a particular RF channel employs multiple geographically separated receivers receiving multiple copies of the same transmitted digital packet, a method of voting the received packets to produce a packet of equal or greater quality than any of the individual copies is necessary. A successful voting methodology requires some form of identifying which packets received by the voter are copies of the same source packet (these multiple packet copies are defined as being in the same voting context). This paper outlines one such voting methodology that uses reception timestamps of received packets (along with packet identifiers) to determine voting contexts.

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A method of digital voting based on reception times of the packets to be voted

By Mark Pevec

 
 

                   

In a digital radio network where a particular RF channel employs multiple geographically separated receivers receiving multiple copies of the same transmitted digital packet, a method of voting the received packets to produce a packet of equal or greater quality than any of the individual copies is necessary.  A successful voting methodology requires some form of identifying which packets received by the voter are copies of the same source packet (these multiple packet copies are defined as being in the same voting context).  This paper outlines one such voting methodology that uses reception timestamps of received packets (along with packet identifiers) to determine voting contexts.

A single source radio transmitter may transmit a stream of digital voice or data packets where each packet contains a packet identifier field with one of a finite set of possible identifiers (labeled ‘Packet ID’ in Figure 1).  Digital packets from this stream may be received by one or more geographically separated receivers which would timestamp these packets based on reception time and forward them to a voting controller (as shown in Figure 1).  The voting controller would examine these packets and vote them according to some quality metric to produce one output packet for each set of received digital packets corresponding to the same source transmitted packet.   The voting controller would identify which received packets were copies of the same source transmitted packet by using both the packet identifiers and the reception timestamps of the recei...