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A Method of Local Mobile Subscriber IP Packet Routing for Multiple GPRS Packet Data Contexts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011400D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Feb-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Feb-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 229K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Joseph E. Baum: AUTHOR

Abstract

GPRS Wireless Data Systems define, ultimately through the Sub-network Dependant Convergence Protocol (SNDCP), the ability to create multiple Packet Data conduits between fixed-end wireline networks and multiple Mobile Compute devices which commonly employ the same Subscriber Unit. When these conduits, or Packet Data Sessions, are created and employed, a logical separation of packet data traffic occurs for each Mobile Compute device through to the selected fixed-end wireline network, specifically when an encapsulating protocol such as Point-to-Point Protocol (over some media) is implemented between the Subscriber Unit and Mobile Compute device. The opportunity to IP route user messages occurs only at the Mobile Compute device and just inside the selected fixed-end wireline network. For the intents of this publication, Mobile Compute devices are synonymous with Mobile Computers such as palm tops or laptop as well as internal applications in the Mobile Subscriber. The publication describes a method of locally routing IP packets between Mobile Computers and/or Internal Applications for a plurality of concurrently IP addressed IP networks in a topologically correct and secure manner.

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A Method of Local Mobile Subscriber IP Packet Routing for Multiple GPRS Packet Data Contexts

By Joseph E. Baum

 
 

                   

GPRS Wireless Data Systems define, ultimately through the Sub-network Dependant Convergence Protocol (SNDCP), the ability to create multiple Packet Data conduits between fixed-end wireline networks and multiple Mobile Compute devices  which commonly employ the same Subscriber Unit. When these conduits, or Packet Data Sessions, are created and employed, a logical separation of packet data traffic occurs for each Mobile Compute device through to the selected fixed-end wireline network, specifically when an encapsulating protocol such as Point-to-Point Protocol (over some media) is implemented between the Subscriber Unit and Mobile Compute device. The opportunity to IP route user messages occurs only at the Mobile Compute device and just inside the selected fixed-end wireline network. For the intents of this publication, Mobile Compute devices are synonymous with Mobile Computers such as palm tops or laptop as well as internal applications in the Mobile Subscriber. The publication describes a method of locally routing IP packets between Mobile Computers and/or Internal Applications for a plurality of concurrently IP addressed IP networks in a topologically correct and secure manner.

At Packet Data Session establishment, the Wireless end can be enabled to select which fixed-end wireline network is desired to be logically connect to. This is parametrically defined within GPRS systems by Access Point Names (APNs). Additionally, each fixed-end network can be private in the sense that their IP addressing schemes may be concurrently managed. That is, the IP address space in one Private network is duplicated in another, where both are isolated from the Internet via firewalls and application proxies. Since there is

interest in keeping fixed-end wireline networks separated from each other for, at the very least, topologically correct IP routing, there is also a desire to ensure security of each wireline network.

From the perspective of a mobile location where multiple Mobile Computers are concurrently physically connected to the same Subscriber Unit, for example a Public Safety mobile communications command post, there is utility in providing the ability to route datagrams to each other locally. For this publication, it is assumed a mobile location configuration of two pairs of Mobile Computers logically connected to one private network each, and an internal application logically connected to the Internet. All elements are physically connected to or implemented within the same Subscriber Unit. Since each Mobile Computer logically connects to a selected fixed-end wireline network which may or may not be the same managed IP address space, only those Mobile Computers can easily route datagrams to each other without the need for application proxies or Network Address Translation services. This would apply to the first pair of M...