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Method for an improved heatsink for ATC during testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011432D
Publication Date: 2003-Feb-19
Document File: 3 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an improved heatsink for active thermal control (ATC) during testing with the objective of minimizing device temperature rise during test. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and an improved test environment.

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Method for an improved heatsink for ATC during testing

Disclosed is a method for an improved heatsink for active thermal control (ATC) during testing with the objective of minimizing device temperature rise during test. Benefits include improved

functionality, improved performance, and an improved test environment.

Background

� � � � � Conventional active heatsinks are capable of temperature increases of about 40° C/sec and temperature decreases of about 34° C/sec. Inefficiency results from losing some heater power directly to the cold heatsink liquid coolant.

        � � � � � The problem of minimizing device junction temperature (Tj) rise during dynamic test pattern execution is conventionally solved using ATC technology, which is being deployed for high-volume manufacturing (HVM). ATC technology involves dynamically modulating the heatsink temperature to counteract instantaneous device power fluctuations. The typical thermal solution is a single phase, liquid cooled heatsink and a 600W heater. Heating is achieved by activating the heater while heatsink cooling is achieved by terminating power to the heater and allowing the thermally cold-biased fluid to cool the heatsink. While effective compared to passive heatsink technologies, the ATC heatsink cost is high and involves a great amount of time.

        � � � � � TECs are conventionally used as a thermal solution for higher power logic devices during Systest.� However, the TEC does not directly touch the device under test (DUT), and conventional TECs are used. This direct implementation is not suitable for the dynamic power variations associated with class testing. The time response of the heatsink is too slow to be effective.

General description

        � � � � � The disclosed method is an improved heatsink for ATC during testing. The method...