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Method to detect dropped video frames during playback by marking the original frames

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011437D
Publication Date: 2003-Feb-19
Document File: 3 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to detect dropped video frames during playback by marking the original frames. Benefits include improved video quality, improved performance, and an improved development environment.

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Method to detect dropped video frames during playback by marking the original frames

Disclosed is a method to detect dropped video frames during playback by marking the original frames. Benefits include improved video quality, improved performance, and an improved development environment.

Background

      Frame number detection algorithms conventionally support quality assessment but the numbers are introduced outside of the video frame, requiring additional proprietary processing.

      Several conventional computation models assess the quality of video playback by comparing the original video and the video being played back (processed video). Most of these models compare the original to the processed frame on a frame-by-frame and output a quality score per frame or group of frames. The original frame must be compared with the corresponding processed frame for the quality score to be accurate. Some challenges to maintaining this accurate frame pairing include dropped frames by the playback software and frame repetition by the underlying decoder.

      Most PC-based video is encoded before playback and subsequently decoded during playback because of bandwidth considerations. Encoding and decoding typically degrade the video quality. Any method that successfully detects dropped frames should function through the encoding/decoding cycle. Any algorithm that works for encoded/decoded video is assumed to work for nonencoded video.

      A macro-block is a 16x16 block of pixels in the video that represent one encoding unit for most encoders.

General description

      The disclosed method detects dropped video frames during playback by marking the original frames. The method introduces known pixel-level artifacts to the original video at specific locations in the frame before the video is prepared or encoded for playback. The disclosed method is compatible with all playback software.

Advantages

              Some implementations of the disclosed structure and method provide one or more of the following advantages:

•             Improved video quality due to the accurate detection of dropped frames

•             Improved performance due to improved validation process by graphics chip sets and video players

 •            Improved development environment due to support for validation activities/tools for software development/debugging

Detailed description

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