Browse Prior Art Database

A Method to install Unix Operating System on remote boxes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000011575D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Mar-06
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Mar-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 141K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

OS Load Interface Application: Disclosed is a user interface capable to perform several centralized Unix installations without requiring specific Unix installation skills while respecting security constraints.

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A Method to install Unix Operating System on remote boxes

OS Load Interface Application: Here is disclosed a user interface capable to perform several centralized Unix installations without requiring specific Unix's installation skills while respecting security constraints.

The three main Unix brands--AIX, HPUX, and Solaris--all provide the capability to launch network installations of their OSs that can complete without user interaction (unattended installs). When an unattended install is performed, it usually must involve at least one IT (skilled) person and completion can be hours, if not days, after the initial request is submitted.

     The goal of the OS Load Interface, or OLI is to have an automated service capable of performing several Unix installs in less than one hour, without the need for outside intervention. Furthermore, prevent the user from having to do the time-consuming footwork of gathering system information and defining OS configurations.

     In the case of SunSolaris installation, it requires to define a 'bootserver' when the target is located on a different network from the server. A mechanism to dynamically define (and install the required code) on a such 'bootserver' box has been provided and when the installation has been completed the bootserver code will be removed in order to release storage.

     A security that allows only authorized users to perform loads has been provided and it can be managed either via LDAP server or via Files.

Components: The three products utilized by OLI are:
1. NIM for AIX
2. HP/UX Ignite for HP
3. JumpStart for Solaris

Each of these products runs on its own OS load server machine. Let us call these servers
1. aixload for NIM
2. hpload for HP/UX Ignite
3. sunload for JumpStart

     In order to centralize requests for Unix OS Loads, each Unix OS load server has a daemon running on it that listens for requests. The daemon is named osloadd. The requests are sent to osloadd from client machines via one of three client routines:
1. load_aix, which communicates with osloadd on the aixload (NIM) machine
2. load_hpux, which communicates with osloadd on the hpload (Ignite) machine
3. load_solaris, which communicates with osloadd on the sunload (JumpStart)

machine

1

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Behaviour:

     Each request sent to osloadd is preceded by the user's name and password. The osloadd daemon verifies that the name and password exist on a LDAP server. Once t...