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Polymer-Coated Metal Fillers to Improve the Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Materials Used in Semiconductor Packaging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012018D
Publication Date: 2003-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a semiconductor packaging method that uses polymer materials that contain polymer-coated metal fillers. Benefits include thermal conductivity without the electrical functionality.

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Polymer-Coated Metal Fillers to Improve the Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Materials Used in Semiconductor Packaging

Disclosed is a semiconductor packaging method that uses polymer materials that contain polymer-coated metal fillers. Benefits include thermal conductivity without the electrical functionality.

Background

Thermal dissipation in high-performance packages is challenging when the power generated by them rises with the increase in input/output (I/O) count density. The heat generated needs to be dissipated efficiently to prevent the device from overheating and producing failures. Using high thermal conductivity materials (such as metal fillers) is the lowest-cost solution to this problem; however, metal fillers are electrical conductors. Therefore, materials containing metal fillers cannot be used on the active side of the die in order to prevent electrical shorting.

Currently, the problem is solved by using thermal-enabling solutions, which include IHS, fins, and thermal interface materials (see Figure 1). Silica fillers are also used, but their thermal conductivity (03.-9 W/mK) is poor, and they do not dissipate heat effectively from high performance devices.

General Description

The disclosed method improves the thermal conductivity of polymer materials in semiconductor devices by using polymer coated metal fillers (see Figure 2). The coating (2-5 microns) provides electrical insulation for the metal filler, and eliminates its electrical functionality. The coated filler is blended in the underfill, mold compound, encapsulant, or solder resist materials. The increase in thermal conductivity of these materials increases the thermal dissipation of packages (see Figure 3).

The steps for making the polymer coated metal fillers are shown in Figure 4. First, the surface of the metal particle is cleaned and chemically activated. The surface is activated with hydroxyl, amine, or oxide groups that can bond with the materials to be coated. The activated surface is then coated with polymer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), emulsion (core-shell) polymer...