Browse Prior Art Database

Amine-Free and Low Amine Stabilization Systems for Scorch Resistance of Flame Retarded Polyurethane Flexible Foams

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012031D
Publication Date: 2003-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Paul WENK: CONTACT

Abstract

It has been discovered, that amine free or low amine stabilization systems can provide scorch resistance and superior light and gas fade stability of polyether and polyester polyol based polyurethane flexible foams compared to traditional amine-based packages. These stabilizer systems also provide excellent scorch resistance when used together with Flame Retardants (FR).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 32% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Amine-Free and Low Amine Stabilization Systems for Scorch Resistance of Flame Retarded Polyurethane Flexible Foams

It has been discovered, that amine free or low amine stabilization systems can provide scorch resistance and superior light and gas fade stability of polyether and polyester polyol based polyurethane flexible foams compared to traditional amine-based packages. These stabilizer systems also provide excellent scorch resistance when used together with Flame Retardants (FR).

Tertiary blends of hindered phenols (i.e. Irganox 1135, Irganox 1076, Irganox 1035, BHT and others) with diphenyl amines (i.e. Irganox 5057 and others) and benzofuranones (i.e. Irganox HP 136 and others) can provide better scorch resistance and superior light and gas fade stability of polyether and polyester polyol based polyurethane flexible foams when compared to stabilization systems containing combinations of hindered phenols and diphenyl amines or benzofuranones alone. The different com- ponents of the blends are present in the following ratio: 2 to 10 parts hindered phenols, 0.5 to 5 parts diphenyl amines and 0.5 to 2 parts benzofuranones in a range of at a total concentration between 0.1 % and 1.5 %.

Due to the many varieties of systems used, polyurethane foam formulations tend to be varied and complex. This is the main reason why a universal FR for PUR flexible foam does not exist. Many fac- tors (foam density, polyol type, isocyanate type, etc.) influence the type and quantity of flame retardant that is used. In addition, physical properties of the foam influence the choice of flame retardant so it is important to understand the end use and flammability requirements needed for each application.

Flexible polyurethane foam is primarily used in automotive, furniture and sound insulation. The FR of choice for more stringent FR tests has been pentabromodiphenyl oxide / phosphate ester blends. Chlorinated phosphate esters or phosphate esters are also used in significant quantities. In Europe the pentabromodiphenyl oxide is now under pressure due to environmental issues and therefore the market is looking for alternatives.

Currently alternatives such as chlorinated phosphate esters or phosphate esters alone are in use. These alternatives are less effective than pentabromodiphenyl oxide and has therefore to be used in higher concentrations, which in some cases leads to higher scorch.

Representative performance using the above described stabilization system is illustrated in Table 1.

Table 1: Scorch Resistance of Polyether based flexible foams containing x % Flame Retardants

Test: Alu Block Scorch Test; Criteria: YI after 30 minutes Static Heat Test at 220 ºC

1) 12 % pentabromodiphenyl oxide / phosphate ester blends

Additive package YI

F1 (no AO) 72.4 F2 (4 parts Ix 1135 / 2 parts Ix 5057 / 1 part Ix HP136) 46.6 F3 (1 part Ix HP 136) 61.8

Additive package YI

F4 (no AO) 73.9 F5 (4 parts Ix 1135 / 2 parts Ix 5057 / 1 part CGX PSL-1) 49.7 F6 (1 parts CGX...