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Manual E-Spring Compression From the Top of the Carrier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012114D
Publication Date: 2003-Apr-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that introduces an E-spring geometry that allows for spring compression from the top side of the carrier on a per pocket basis. Benefits include cost reductions, and not removing the carrier from the tool to correct substrate out of pocket (SOOP) issues.

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Manual E-Spring Compression From the Top of the Carrier

Disclosed is a method that introduces an E-spring geometry that allows for spring compression from the top side of the carrier on a per pocket basis. Benefits include cost reductions, and not removing the carrier from the tool to correct substrate out of pocket (SOOP) issues.

Background

Current state of the art uses a manual part loader (MPL) to actuate all springs simultaneously, and allow for hand placement of substrates for design of experiments (DOE) and new product introduction (NPI) builds. However, current state of the art does not allow for corrections while the carrier is still in the equipment set.

General Description

Metal carriers are media used in processing semiconductor packages (see Figure 1).  Each carrier contains numerous pockets (e.g. 8,10 or 12 pockets) in which packages are loaded using an Automatic Part Loader (APL) for high volume production, or with a manual part loader (MPL) for low volume production (i.e. DOE testing). The parts are restrained in the carrier by the force supplied from the E-spring. The equipment capability is dependent on the accuracy and precision of the carrier. The equipment utilizes carrier features to precisely locate semiconductor packages for module processing.

The carrier spring legs are compressed to a dimension of 12.5mm. The resulting pocket opening must be sufficiently large for placing the substrate into the pocket. The standard design rule is a minimum pocket ope...