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Knowledge Extended Framework

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012258D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Apr-23
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Apr-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The Knowledge Management Extended Framework is a general reference framework which collects all key aspects of Knowledge Management, based on a four layers layout: portal, services, context, and resources.

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Knowledge Extended Framework

  The Knowledge Management Extended Framework is a general reference framework which collects all key aspects of Knowledge Management, based on a four layers layout: portal, services, context, and resources.

Resources

They are the containers of knowledge: not just documents and other containers for explicit knowledge, but people, events, places, and methods.

Places: virtual places where people can meet, as newsgroups or teamrooms; information about physical places and facilities, as meeting rooms; references to sources of knowledge, as intranet or Internet sites.

Events: external events, as conferences, seminars, stages; internal public events, as kick-offs, education classes, presentations; internal restricted events, as team or personal meetings.

People: people with specific roles and responsibilities, team members; experts, internal contact points, tutors, key professionals; external contacts, other companies' people, freelances.

Assets: electronic and physical libraries; knowledge repositories; press releases, business reports, statistics; references, bibliographies, dictionaries, glossaries; data bases.

Methods: methodologies, processes, work products descriptions; best practices and narrative databases; success stories and lessons learned; standards, user profiles, document templates, building blocks.

Context

Contextualisation of knowledge is key for an efficient use of it: maps, catalogues, schemes, and policies are the way knowledge is understood and managed. Models: how knowledge is created, acquired, captured, organised, transferred, reused. Maps: which knowledge is available, where is it, and how to get to it.

Catalogues: indexes of resources, that is, documents, people, and whatever can be catalogued and organised.

Policies: internal and external policies, national and international laws,

Know...