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Method for a spring-like retention mechanism for board assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012436D
Publication Date: 2003-May-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a spring-like retention mechanism for board assembly. Benefits include improved reliability, improved performance, improved ergonomics, and improved assembly environment.

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Method for a spring-like retention mechanism for board assembly

Disclosed is a method for a spring-like retention mechanism for board assembly. Benefits include improved reliability, improved performance, improved ergonomics, and improved assembly environment.

Background

              In conventional printed circuit board (PCB) assembly, the retention leads are often too rigid. When the retention lead pitch is too wide, the rigidity causes high assembly force, which can cause crushed pins (see Figure 1). Due to the high insertion force, ergonomics are also a concern. When the retention lead pitch is too narrow, the retention force is too low. Parts can be loose and tilt or fall off during assembly.

      Conventionally, additional fixtures are used to hold the parts on the board. Specifications for the retention lead pitch and the kink pitch that are defined to optimize the force during board assembly must be stringently enforced. Additionally, kink edges are chamfered to enable the smooth entry of the part into the through hole due to the retention lead’s rigidity during supplier processing.

              The process window for the interaction between the retention pitch and the through-hole pitch is narrow and can result in defects.

Description

      The disclosed method is a spring-like retention mechanism that creates a self-optimizing retention force when added to a PCB (see Figure 2). The retention lead engages the through hole with ease and springs back to lock the part into position (see Figure 3). The retention pitch center-to-center (dimension A) meets the board’s through-hole retention pitch.

              The critical-to-function parameter can be isolate to the retention pitch. The kink dimension can be excluded. Because the spring-like mechanism en...