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Method for a low-temperature liquid encapsulation stencil printing in-line curing process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012442D
Publication Date: 2003-May-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a low-temperature liquid encapsulation stencil printing in-line curing process. Benefits include improved functionality, improved throughput, and improved process simplicity.

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Method for a low-temperature liquid encapsulation stencil printing in-line curing process

Disclosed is a method for a low-temperature liquid encapsulation stencil printing in-line curing process. Benefits include improved functionality, improved throughput, and improved process simplicity.

Background

      A requirement exists for packaging a single cavity or matrix-array die with lower process temperatures, lower cost, and higher throughput than are conventionally achievable with dam-and-fill encapsulation and molding processes. The accuracy and look of a mold process are required using a liquid encapsulant.

              Encapsulant is conventionally dispensed using a dam-and-fill or glob-top process. Tight control of the tolerances is difficult to achieve during dispensing. Multiple steps are required. They are typically one or two dispense steps and a curing step. A low-temperature molding process does not exist.

              Conventional solutions include:

•             Using materials equipment and cure methods that are not cost effective for high volume manufacturing (HVM)

•             Encapsulating at higher temperatures using a dam-and-fill process

 •    Molding the part

              For example, a dam material can be applied around the perimeter of the package and cured. Then, the encapsulant fill material is dispensed into the dammed area to form the package around the die (see Figure 1). This process requires two steps, dispense and cure. Only one package can be processed at a time.

General description

      The disclosed method is low-temperature stencil printing liquid encapsulate, which can be cured in process.

              The key elements of the method include:

•             Stencil printing process that enables low temperature curing liquid encapsulant to be screen-printed over a die

•             Curing catalyst unit, such as thermal, ultraviolet, radio frequency, or infrared,...