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Alignment of Cellular Honeycomb Structures for Canning with Moiré Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012510D
Publication Date: 2003-May-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Recent developments in thin-walled, honeycomb-type catalyst supports have provided advantages for reaction chemistry due to greater honeycomb geometry surface areas. However, the developments have provided disadvantages for some practical manufacturing issues that follow from weaker mechanical properties. Satisfactory load-bearing strength is necessary to survive manufacturing stresses such as those from compressing a honeycomb into its metal can. With the square honeycomb cell structures, this strength is highly anisotropic, so fractures occur along the columns (or equivalently rows) of the honeycomb with any slight misalignment

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Alignment of Cellular Honeycomb Structures for Canning with Moiré Patterns

     Recent developments in thin-walled, honeycomb-type catalyst supports have provided advantages for reaction chemistry due to greater honeycomb geometry surface areas. However, the developments have provided disadvantages for some practical manufacturing issues that follow from weaker mechanical properties. Satisfactory load-bearing strength is necessary to survive manufacturing stresses such as those from compressing a honeycomb into its metal can. With the square honeycomb cell structures, this strength is highly anisotropic, so fractures occur along the columns (or equivalently rows) of the honeycomb with any slight misalignment.

     The solution is found in an in-process control to assure the correct alignment of the honeycomb cell columns with the applied load. The proposed method uses non-focusing, collimated light to set the best alignment through the overall intensity of a moiré pattern. It is recognized that more than 1,100 patents utilizing the moiré effect have been filed since 1973. No moiré effect patents were found that had been applied specifically to alignment of catalysts to increase the manufacturing yield or durability.

Method

     The incident light passes through a reference grating or grid (such as the grid of a slice of the honeycomb itself) and then passes through the in-process catalyst honeycomb (or is reflected back from the front surface of the honeycomb). The overall transmitted (or end-surface-reflected) light intensity is then measured with a light meter. A mechanical translation is applied to the reference grating to find a maximum (or other extremum) of the intensity signal. The in-process honeycomb is then rotated by a controlling mechanical fixture by fractions of a degree to establish a maximum intensity. The maximum intensity corresponds to the alignment of the in-process honeycomb with the reference (calibrated) orientation. Out of alignment (negative image) In alignment (negative image)

      As an illustration, take two honeycombs and view end-on in series -- there is a noticeable maximum when both h...