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Carrying IPv6 Information in RIPv2

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012556D
Publication Date: 2003-May-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 139K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that enhances RIPv2 so that IPv4 and IPv6 capable routers are able to carry both IPv4 and IPv6 information in one packet and in one session. Benefits include fewer frames and less bandwidth usage.

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Carrying IPv6 Information in RIPv2

Disclosed is a method that enhances RIPv2 so that IPv4 and IPv6 capable routers are able to carry both IPv4 and IPv6 information in one packet and in one session. Benefits include fewer frames and less bandwidth usage.

Background

Currently, the problem of carrying IPv6 information over a IPv4 network is only addressed by BGP multiprotocol extensions. BGP is a sophisticated protocol which creates difficulties in most routers and LANs due to its complexity and resource requirements.

General Description

RIPv2, as defined in RFC2453, is only capable of carrying IPv4 information. RIPng, defined by RFC2080, is a RIP implementation on a IPv6 router designed to carry IPv6 information only. The disclosed method proposes RIPv2 enhancements so that IPv4 and IPv6 capable routers are able to carry both IPv4 and IPv6 information in one packet and in one session. Figure 1 shows the default format of RIPv2 frame (taken from RFC2453).

The problem of differentiating IPv6 prefixes from IPv4 routes is easily overcome by using another range of metrics. The disclosed method proposes that the new-RIP capable router sends IPv4 routes in a standard way and the IPv6 in a way defined by RFC2080, only with metrics from 129 to 144 (the MSB bit in RIPng metric is set to 1). This way, any standard RIP router ignores the IPv6 tuple as carrying a false metric, which would not lead to confusion between standard RIP and new-RIP-capable routers. Figure 2 presents IPv6 tuple c...