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Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Filesystem Maintenance Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000012722D
Original Publication Date: 2003-May-21
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-May-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Local filesystem maintenance processing can be off-loaded to a remote server, utilizing the remote server's memory and CPU resources.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

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Remote Filesystem Maintenance Processing

Disclosed is a method for off-loading local filesystem maintenance processing to a remote server. Typically when file system maintenance is required, it is necessary to unmount the filesystem and perform maintenance directly on the device. For a large filesystem this can require a lot of memory and CPU time. On a busy fileserver this can result in poor server performance while the maintenance is going on as well as poor performance of the maintenance operation itself. During this time the filesystem that is being worked on is unavailable.

The invention is simply to perform filesystem maintenance remotely over a network connection, where both the memory and CPU resources of a second system are utilized to perform the work without impacting the fileserver where the filesystem resides. For example, fsck can run on system B for a filesystem that resides on system A. This could even be a different hardware platform and/or operating system. Other than handling the communications and device I/O, there is no memory or CPU time impact on the fileserver while this maintenance is occurring.

One could envision a grid computing environment where the computational resources for performing file system maintenance could be provided on-demand as needed.

The only thing necessary for an implementation is a means to remotely access the block device. Linux* provides such a capability with the Network Block Device (NBD) and this should be possi...