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Command Line Programming Syntax in a Multi-System Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013001D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jul-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

While testing a client\server product on multiple computers with different operating systems, there was a need to interact with both the Client and Server operating systems simultaneously. Disclosed is a Programming Language Syntax that treats Computer Systems as "objects" and allows "methods" to be called against the System. The methods would be custom-designed modules that would execute instructions against the specified System, The basic syntax is : [SystemName]->[activity]([options]) Activities take place within the context of the system, but the results can be shared among all systems. For example, a variable named $Server can be declared within the context of SystemA and SystemB. When an activity occurs on SystemA and requires the value for $Server, the context is assumed to be SystemA. But it is possible to refer to the $Server variable in SystemB by explicity referencing it using $SystemB_Server. Other advantages of using this system are:

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Command Line Programming Syntax in a Multi-System Environment

While testing a client\server product on multiple computers with different operating systems, there was a need to interact with both the Client and Server operating systems simultaneously. Disclosed is a Programming Language Syntax that treats Computer Systems as "objects" and allows "methods" to be called against the System. The methods would be custom-designed modules that would execute instructions against the specified System, The basic syntax is :

[SystemName]->[activity]([options])

Activities take place within the context of the system, but the results can be shared among all systems. For example, a variable named $Server can be declared within the context of SystemA and SystemB. When an activity occurs on SystemA and requires the value for $Server, the context is assumed to be SystemA. But it is possible to refer to the $Server variable in SystemB by explicity referencing it using $SystemB_Server.

Other advantages of using this system are:

- The execution of the script is logged, and can easily be reproduced by hand by following the log. - This method places more emphasis on the System rather than on the actual program. - The script would be processed by an interpreter that would manage System Connections, Variable Declarations, Command Execution, and other activities required by the user. - Variables are declared and used in the context of the System. - The action code would contain appropriate functionality to execute against any operating system. This increases the portability of a set of instructions.

Below is a sample of script that creates a connection to SystemA and SystemB, executes commands on SystemB, and creates a summary file on SystemA.

SystemA->declare(Name=Server Value=unix1)
SystemA->declare(Name=User Value=user1)
SystemA->declare(Name=Password Value=password1)
SystemA->declare(Name=Prompt Value=$Serve...