Browse Prior Art Database

High Data Rate Disk Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013003D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed here is an architecture for a hard disk drive HDD) capable of supporting data rates many times that of a single head-disk combination. As performance requirements for HDD's increase due to multimedia and more complex video applications, capabilities of the technology may be exceeded. For example, the ability of a single head to write data at extremely high data rates may be limiited due to eddy current, inductance, or magnetic materials response time limits. Also, switching response times of the magnetic storage media and the read response times of high performance heads may not be sufficiently short to support very high data rate channels 100 MB/sec).

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High Data Rate Disk Drive

   Disclosed here is an architecture for a hard disk drive ( HDD) capable of supporting data rates many times that of a single head-disk combination. As performance requirements for HDD's increase due to multimedia and more complex video applications, capabilities of the technology may be exceeded. For example, the ability of a single head to write data at extremely high data rates may be limiited due to eddy current, inductance, or magnetic materials response time limits. Also, switching response times of the magnetic storage media and the read response times of high performance heads may not be sufficiently short to support very high data rate channels ( >> 100 MB/sec).

   The architecture disclosed is one in which the data to be stored is multiplexed, or 'striped' across multiple heads within a single HDD. This will allow the HDD to maintain the same capacity, while reducing the extreme high frequency requirements on individual read/write elements within the drive. Depending upon the degree of complication required for a specific design, data may be written simultaneously on two or more heads, or a memory buffer used to allow heads to be addressed sequentially, while still maintaining high data rate performance. In a preferred implementation, a single data stream would be split between two or more heads on separate surfaces in a single HDD. Reading data would be the inverse process of writing, with appropriate data interleave and ECC correc...