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A Method for Securing Parts of an e-mail Correspondence Among e-mail Recipients

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013064D
Original Publication Date: 2001-May-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A Method for Securing Parts of an e-mail Correspondence Among e-mail Recipients 1. Problem Statement Modern e-mail systems allow the user to construct electronic correspondencies (e-mail) according to a common format as specified in Figure 1 below: Figure 1 Common format of e-mail

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  A Method for Securing Parts of an e-mail Correspondence Among e-mail Recipients

A Method for Securing Parts of an e-mail Correspondence Among e-mail Recipients

1. Problem Statement

Modern e-mail systems allow the user to construct electronic correspondencies (e-mail) according to a common format as specified in Figure 1 below:

Figure 1 - Common format of e-mail

To-list (e.g. To: list of e-mail recipients) Carbon Copy-list (e.g. cc: list of e-mail recipients) Blind Carbon Copy-list (e.g. bcc: list of e-mail recipients) From:

Message Block-1 Message Block-2 Message Block-3...

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Message Block-(n-2) Message Block-(n-1) Message Block-n

A limitation of such a format is that each of the e-mail recipients - whether they are a member of any of the To-list, the Carbon Copy-list, or the Blind Carbon Copy-list - receives all of the Message Blocks (1-n). This disclosure proposes a function whereby Message Blocks can be selectively tagged, so as to allow specified Message Blocks to only be delivered to specified e-mail recipients - thereby hiding them from all but the indicated recipient.

Note that the attributes of each Message Block are defined by the e-mail editor being used. An advanced e-mail editor which support Rich Text Formats (RTF) defines Message Blocks to be any of the objects which are supported by that e-mail editor. Examples of such objects include, but are not limited to, text, tables, imbedded objects (charts, spreadsheets, database tables), sound and vide...