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GELLED COMPOSITIONS FOR POLYMERIZABLE MONOMERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013107D
Publication Date: 2003-Jun-13

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Richard O'Brian: AUTHOR

Abstract

Gelled compositions that include acrylate or other polymerizable monomers for coatings and other applications are disclosed. The gellant, preferably a modified polyamide, provides the desired rheological and thixotropic properties and compatibility with components in the formulation. The gellant is readily incorporated into the liquid-based formulation by mild heating and shear mixing to form, when cooled, a homogeneous, very weak to solid gel. The desired rheological properties, including freestanding solids to pumpable or sprayable liquids, can be tailored by the gellant loading in the formulation.

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TECHNICAL DISCLOSURE

GELLED COMPOSITIONS FOR POLYMERIZABLE MONOMERS

A.                 ABSTRACT

Gelled compositions that include acrylate or other polymerizable monomers for coatings and other applications are disclosed.� The gellant, preferably a modified polyamide, provides the desired rheological and thixotropic properties and compatibility with components in the formulation.� The gellant is readily incorporated into the liquid-based formulation by mild heating and shear mixing to form, when cooled, a homogeneous, very weak to solid gel.� The desired rheological properties, including freestanding solids to pumpable or sprayable liquids, can be tailored by the gellant loading in the formulation.

B.                 POLYMERIZABLE MONOMERS

1.                  Overview

The compositions disclosed herein contain at least one polymerizable monomer.� In the context of the present disclosure, a polymerizable monomer is a chemical that becomes incorporated into a macromolecule upon exposure of the monomer to initiating reaction conditions and, optionally, one or more other monomers.� The monomers useful in the present technology are those that undergo chain-reaction polymerization, also sometimes referred to as addition polymerization.� In chain-reaction polymerization, a monomer is activated in some manner, and the activated monomer reacts with another monomer to generate an activated species consisting of two monomers joined together.� This reactive “two-monomer” species then reacts with another monomer to generate a reactive species comprising three monomers, and the process of monomer addition is repeated until the active state is terminated through a different type of reaction.�

Most of the industrially useful monomers that undergo addition polymerization contain a carbon-carbon double bond.� Such monomers can be included in a composition taught herein, and will be described extensively below.� Acrylates are one example of this type of monomer.� The present technology is also suited for polymerizable monomers that do not polymerize via a carbon-carbon double bond.� One such class of polymerizable monomer is the epoxy-containing materials.�

The mechanism of polymerization for most carbon-carbon bond containing polymerizable monomers is via free radical intermediates.� That is, the “reactive state” of the monomer is a free radical, and this reactive free radical reacts with another monomer to generate a free radical-containing di-monomeric species that undergoes further chain reaction.� However, the technology of the present disclosure is not limited to monomers that polymerize via free radical intermediates, but includes other types of reactive intermediates, e.g., cations and anions.� The type of initiation employed to create the first reactive species determines the mechanism of polymerization.� In many instances, a chemical known as an initiator is added to the monomer, where the properties of the initiator often determines whether the monomers will polymerize via a radical, anionic...