Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamically generating color families and assigning colors to differentiate multi-level hierarchical groups

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013241D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jul-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 4 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Dynamically generating color families and assigning colors to differentiate multi-level hierarchical groups Tree diagrams generated by existing cluster analysis programs do contain relationship information, but in that format the information is not easy to understand at a glance. The proposed solution makes the diagrams much easier to understand by using automatically calculated color sets to distinguish the groups and subgroups. Figure 1 below is a tree diagram representing relationship information from a cluster analysis of a card-sorting exercise. Two pairs of items, and the paths connecting the members of each of these pairs, have been highlighted for illustration purposes. (A standard tree diagram would not contain this highlighting.) The first pair ("Aptiva"* and "Aptiva's ease of use") are connected by a path that remains relatively close to the origin, indicating that these items were grouped together by most of the participants. The line connecting the second pair ("Desktop" and "UI Fundamentals") travels all the way out to the maximum distance of 1.00. This path indicates that some members of each of the groups to which the items belong were always placed in separate groups in the card-sorting exercise.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

Dynamically generating color families and assigning colors to differentiate

multi-level hierarchical groups

Tree diagrams generated by existing cluster analysis programs do contain relationship information, but in that format the information is not easy to understand at a glance. The proposed solution makes the diagrams much easier to understand by using automatically calculated color sets to distinguish the groups and subgroups.

Figure 1 below is a tree diagram representing relationship information from a cluster analysis of a card-sorting exercise. Two pairs of items, and the paths connecting the members of each of these pairs, have been highlighted for illustration purposes. (A standard tree diagram would not contain this highlighting.) The first pair ("Aptiva"* and "Aptiva's ease of use") are connected by a path that remains relatively close to the origin, indicating that these items were grouped together by most of the participants. The line connecting the second pair ("Desktop" and "UI Fundamentals") travels all the way out to the maximum distance of 1.00. This path indicates that some members of each of the groups to which the items belong were always placed in separate groups in the card-sorting exercise.

The current invention uses background colors to differentiate main groups of related items. In Figure 2 below, the items fall into four main groups, distinguished by their respective background colors. The background colors are assigned automatically fro...