Browse Prior Art Database

Programmable Price Tags

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013244D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This disclosure describes a price tag for consumer products that can be easily modified when product prices change without having to re-label the products. It is labor-intensive to place price labels on products and every time prices change the process must be repeated. This problem has been solved in the past by eliminating the labels and displaying prices on shelf tags. However, products are often misplaced on shelves or the shelf labels are knocked off or moved. As a result, consumers will not purchase the product because they cannot determine the price and store employees must spend time to find the price for the customer and then to fix the mislabeling problem. This invention would use an RFID device coupled to an electronic paper label. The label would be affixed to the product by the manufacturer and could either be shipped blank or with the manufacturer's suggested price. To update the prices in the field, an RF transmitter would send the new price information directly to the product on the shelf and the electronic paper would display this new price. Programmable shelf tags solve the labor problem but present a new problem when the product gets separated from the shelf tag for various reasons. Also, once moved from the shelf to the shopping cart, the customer cannot verify the price of the product without returning to the shelf or to a kiosk with a barcode scanner. 1

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Programmable Price Tags

This disclosure describes a price tag for consumer products that can be easily modified when product prices change without having to re-label the products. It is labor-intensive to place price labels on products and every time prices change the process must be repeated. This problem has been solved in the past by eliminating the labels and displaying prices on shelf tags. However, products are often misplaced on shelves or the shelf labels are knocked off or moved. As a result, consumers will not purchase the product because they cannot determine the price and store employees must spend time to find the price for the customer and then to fix the mislabeling problem.

This invention would use an RFID device coupled to an electronic paper label. The label would be affixed to the product by the manufacturer and could either be shipped blank or with the manufacturer's suggested price. To update the prices in the field, an RF transmitter would send the new price information directly to the product on the shelf and the electronic paper would display this new price.

Programmable shelf tags solve the labor problem but present a new problem when the product gets separated from the shelf tag for various reasons. Also, once moved from the shelf to the shopping cart, the customer cannot verify the price of the product without returning to the shelf or to a kiosk with a barcode scanner.

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