Browse Prior Art Database

IPL Completion Indicator Based On Previous IPL Timings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013461D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jul-21
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

With current Firmware designs there are no possible way of knowing how much time it will take to boot up a system.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

IPL Completion Indicator Based On Previous IPL Timings

With current Firmware designs there are no possible way of knowing how much time it will take to boot up a system.

IBM Server systems have Service Processors (SP) independent of main system processors. The Service Processor complex has its own processor and memory and has access to Non-Volatile Random Access Memory( NVRAM). Service processor initializes system complex and boot Operating System (OS) to operation.

This method uses the information stored by Service Processors in NVRAM from the previous boot. After each subsequent boot, system firmware will know how long it will take to boot the same system. Thus enabling SP to post on to the Operator Panel (LED indicator) the % of time left for completion to OS login prompt.

The main advantage to having a complex Server System notify the user of how much longer it will take to complete its boot process is that it allows the customer to decide when to schedule rebooting a system. If it is too long he can schedule it overnight or offshift times.

To achieve this idea a user will have to boot the system for the first time. During the first boot, at Power-on, Service Procesor will start a timer and it will save that time in NVRAM. Once Service Processor receives the first "heart beat" from Operating System at boot-up completion it saves the time in NVRAM. Operating System communicates with Service Processor after boot completion. Internally we call this "heartbeat". Successive "heartbeats" are used to know if Operating System is alive or had problems etc.,

When the customer decides to reboot the system, NVRAM will contain the time it took to boot from the previous boot and it will use that timer to notify the user how much longer it will take for the system to complete booting.

For example: If the previous boot took 25 minutes to completely bootup then at the next boot the user will see on the op-panel or console: 25 min. (at startup) and the timer will start decrement by one minute, for example: 24 min. left, 23 min. left, etc.... till
1min. left. It could be made into % left to boot.

Once the customer decides to change hardware configuration, the Service Processor will then zero out the NVRAM area where the previous time was held and it will start the process over. Changing config...