Browse Prior Art Database

Staged neuRFon™ System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013471D
Original Publication Date: 2003-Jun-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Edgar H. Callaway, Jr: AUTHOR

Abstract

A staged neuRFon™ (or other wireless sensor network) system is described, in which the life of a network of battery-powered nodes is extended by placing additional nodes in the physical area of the network during network initiation. The additional nodes conserve their power resources by remaining asleep, or in a very low power consumption mode, until the batteries of the original operating network nodes are near exhaustion. The additional nodes then wake up and replace the original nodes, providing network services for an extended period of time, beyond that otherwise possible with a given node and battery design.

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Staged neuRFon™ System

Edgar H. Callaway, Jr.

Abstract

A staged neuRFon™ (or other wireless sensor network) system is described, in which the life of a network of battery-powered nodes is extended by placing additional nodes in the physical area of the network during network initiation.  The additional nodes conserve their power resources by remaining asleep, or in a very low power consumption mode, until the batteries of the original operating network nodes are near exhaustion.  The additional nodes then wake up and replace the original nodes, providing network services for an extended period of time, beyond that otherwise possible with a given node and battery design.

Body

Some applications for wireless sensor networks, and other types of ad hoc distributed networks, require a network lifetime in excess of the lifetime of the individual nodes themselves. For example, in military sensing applications, it is desirable to have small sensors, with small batteries (or other limited energy sources), yet have the network function a long time, since replacement is often difficult or impossible. Similarly, in home and industrial security applications it is economically beneficial to maximize the life of the network, since the replacement of batteries in a large network (of perhaps hundreds or thousands of nodes) is expensive.  One notes that it is often less expensive to place additional nodes at the time of network installation than it is to find nodes later to replace batteries.

Many ad hoc network protocols (e.g., Bluetooth) have some provision for temporarily removing a network node from the network. (In Bluetooth, this is referred to as "Hold" mode; "Park" mode could also be used.) However, to the knowledge of the author there has not been any use of this mode in a coordinated way that exploits the density of the network devices to extend the life of the network.


The described invention is the placement at network installation of a larger number of nodes in a network than that required to maintain connectivity of the network. "Excess" devices, inactive nodes not needed for connectivity, initia...