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Coding Technique, Logging Using Macros

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013611D
Original Publication Date: 2000-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Tracing in a message broker such as MQSeries Integrator Version 2 may take advantage of the power of the broker by placing the trace into a designated messageFlow node. The message flow following this node may process the trace information by filtering and formatting in various ways for more effective use. In such a message broker (or other message processing system) we may expand single nodes seen in the tool to multiple nodes seen by the execution engine. One example of such expansion can be used to control logging and tracing. Thus when tracing is turned on globally in the tool, many extra execution time trace nodes will be generated automatically; one on each connection, and the execution graph automatically rewired appropriately. When tracing in turned on for a specific node, execution time trace nodes will be generated for each input and output port to that node, and the execution graph automatically rewired appropriately. Examples: These examples are all based on a 'straight through' message flow to simplify diagrams. represents a connection

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Coding Technique, Logging Using Macros

Tracing in a message broker such as MQSeries Integrator Version 2 may take advantage of the power of the broker by placing the trace into a designated messageFlow node. The message flow following this node may process the trace information by filtering and formatting in various ways for more effective use.

     In such a message broker (or other message processing system) we may expand single nodes seen in the tool to multiple nodes seen by the execution engine. One example of such expansion can be used to control logging and tracing. Thus when tracing is turned on globally in the tool, many extra execution time trace nodes will be generated automatically; one on each connection, and the execution graph automatically rewired appropriately.

     When tracing in turned on for a specific node, execution time trace nodes will be generated for each input and output port to that node, and the execution graph automatically rewired appropriately.

Examples: These examples are all based on a 'straight through' message flow to simplify diagrams. -> represents a connection
[] represents a terminal (input or output by context)

Example 1: untraced scanario -> [] node1 [] -> [] node2 [] -> [] node3 [] ->

Example 2: 'manually traced' output of node 2 -> [] node1 [] -> [] node2 [] -> [] trace [] -> [] node3 [] ->

Example 3: 'macro traced' output of node 2. -> [] node1 [] -> [] node2 [trace] -> [] node3 [] -> Tracing is set as an attribute on the output...