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Application-based printer-generated print preview

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013647D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Apr-07
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a system entitled "Application-based printer-generated print preview." With this system an application designer can send data to a printer and the application designer can determine what the output will look like from the printer's perspective. The value of this is that an application designer can see such things as 1.) if objects used by the print job are present (fonts, logos, etc.) 2.) if the right colors are being used, 3.) if the printer has enough system resources to process the job, 4.) if the appropriate finishing will be applied to the print job. These decisions are usually made by the printer operator in a separate facility.

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Application-based printer-generated print preview

   Disclosed is a system entitled "Application-based printer-generated print preview." With this system an application designer can send data to a printer and the application designer can determine what the output will look like from the printer's perspective. The value of this is that an application designer can see such things as 1.) if objects used by the print job are present (fonts, logos, etc.) 2.) if the right colors are being used, 3.) if the printer has enough system resources to process the job, 4.) if the appropriate finishing will be applied to the print job. These decisions are usually made by the printer operator in a separate facility.

Here is the process:

1.) Application creator builds the application and begins a Print Preview.
2.) Application creator selects Print Preview from an application.
3.) The application builds the job with the Print Description Language (PDL) of choice and sends the job to a Print Preview listener on the printer.

   4.) The Print Preview listener on the printer invokes the raster image processor (RIP) on the printer.

5.) The rasterizer builds the bitmap which will be sent back to the Print Preview listener.
6.) The Print Preview listener sends a message to the Application Print Preview listener saying that it is ready to transmit the bitmap.

7.) The bitmap is transferred to the Application Print Preview listener.
8.) The Application creator reviews the bitmap(s) rendered by the Print Preview listener on the printer - and if acceptable - selects Print.

   Step 1 clarification.) We are presuming use of a GUI or an application which has a Print Preview option. This is a common feature of most GUI-based applications.

   Step 2 clarification.) An Application creator is someone most likely using a tool such as Lotus FreeLance Graphics on a PC or other platform. This process should emulate what the Print Preview step looks like today except that the Print Preview code will not ask the application what the Print Preview will look like. It will ask the printer itself what the Print Preview will look like, and it will wait for the printer to respond. Ideally the Print Preview could run in the background so that the Application Designer could be productive while the transmission of data between user and printer proceeds.

   Step 3 clarification.) The Print Preview step will require changes at an operating system level so that application builders can use this step. The Print Preview code will have to be able to do three things: 1.) generate the print data with the PDL of choice, 2.) open a communications link with a Print Preview Listener on the printer, and 3.) listen on a socket or interface for the bitmap that the Print Preview Listener on the printer will be sending.

   There would have to be a standardized port which a printer could listen on...