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Method for Search of Database Fields Accessed through "Touch Tone" Keypads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013721D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A method is described that provides for the rapid search of alphanumeric database fields using only input from a numeric telephone keypad. Rather than using a standard wild-card search to narrow down the choices, the database is pre-processed and a file is created that is the duplicate of the searched file, except that any non-numeric characters are replaced with the character "*", which is available on the standard telephone keypad. The user is requested to enter the searched for value with replacing every non-numeric character. This allows the search to be made using an exact match, which is much faster and less processor intensive.

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Method for Search of Database Fields Accessed through "Touch Tone" Keypads

   A method is described that provides for the rapid search of alphanumeric
database fields using only input from a numeric telephone keypad. Rather than
using a standard wild-card search to narrow down the choices, the database is
pre-processed and a file is created that is the duplicate of the searched file,
except that any non-numeric characters are replaced with the character "*", which
is available on the standard telephone keypad. The user is requested to enter
the searched for value with "*" replacing every non-numeric character. This
allows the search to be made using an exact match, which is much faster and less
processor intensive.

There are many instances when one must search a database for an alphameric value.
Entering an alphameric value on a telephone type of keypad is extremely time
consuming. In order to ease the effort in entering this data, typically a wild
card search of the data is used, with the user entering an asterisk in place of
the non-numeric data. For instance, a serial number of 1234+A would be entered
as 1234**. The results obtained from the wild card search would be presented to
the user for selection of the correct entry. In a typical Voice Response Unit
application, the VRU would create and play the message, "Press 1 if the serial is
1234-A, press 2 if it is 1234-B, and press 3 if it is 1234+A. Unfortunately,
this type of wild card search is time consuming.

In one example, a w...