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Browse Prior Art Database

TAPE APPLICATION TOOL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013744D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Scott Graves: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention relates to the field of printed circuit board manufacture and more specifically the placement of Kapton* tape to the backside of the boards to prevent solder from coming onto contact with specific areas. This invention is simply a hand tool to aid in the proper placement of Kapton tape onto printed circuit boards. As an operator is about to place a piece of tape, he/she places the piece of tape on the tip of the tool to provide a "handle" to aid in proper placement (see the figure). The invention also tends to reduce the chance of damage to the printed circuit board by keeping the operator's fingers from coming into contact with the board. By allowing the operator's finger to come into contact with the board, two types of damage could occur. 1. A surface mount component could be knocked off the surface of the board.

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TAPE APPLICATION TOOL

This invention relates to the field of printed circuit board manufacture and more specifically the placement of Kapton* tape to the backside of the boards to prevent solder from coming onto contact with specific areas.

This invention is simply a hand tool to aid in the proper placement of Kapton tape onto printed circuit boards. As an operator is about to place a piece of tape, he/she places the piece of tape on the tip of the tool to provide a "handle" to aid in proper placement (see the figure).

The invention also tends to reduce the chance of damage to the printed circuit board by keeping the operator's fingers from coming into contact with the board. By allowing the operator's finger to come into contact with the board, two types of damage could occur.

1. A surface mount component could be knocked off the surface of the board.
2. Oil from the operator's fingers could get onto copper areas of the board which would not allow solder to adhere properly during the wave solder process. __________________________________________________

* Trademark of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

(HARDCOPY FIGURE NOT AVAILABLE)

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