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Browse Prior Art Database

Use of MCTs to Change Printer Functionality

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013784D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The 4610 printer contains entities called microcode controlled tolerances or MCTs. MCTs were originally designed to be used to allow microcode to compensate for mechanical tolerances in the printer such as drivetrain backlash. This disclosure describes expanding the use of MCTs to allow the functionality of the printer to be altered by changing MCT values. MCTs are stored in a nonvolatile memory device such as an EEPROM so that their value will persist across power on/off cycles. In developing follow on models of the 4610 TI-1/2 printers, the use of MCTs allowed the same microcode to be used for single byte character set (SBCS), double byte character set (DBCS), and model 4 emulation models. By sending the appropriate command, the user can load a specific value into an MCT such that upon resetting the printer, it will take on new functionality such as converting from a SBCS to DBCS and vice versa or converting a SBCS native 4610 to a SBCS model 4 emulation 4610 and vice versa. Problem solved by this disclosure the ability to use one microcode image in multiple printer models. This means that only one code image needs to be maintained in the field rather than one code image for each printer model. 1

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Use of MCTs to Change Printer Functionality

The 4610 printer contains entities called microcode controlled tolerances or MCTs. MCTs were originally designed to be used to allow microcode to compensate for mechanical tolerances in the printer such as drivetrain backlash. This disclosure describes expanding the use of MCTs to allow the functionality of the printer to be altered by changing MCT values. MCTs are stored in a nonvolatile memory device such as an EEPROM so that their value will persist across power on/off cycles. In developing follow on models of the 4610 TI-1/2 printers, the use of MCTs allowed the same microcode to be used for single byte character set (SBCS), double byte character set (DBCS), and model 4 emulation models. By sending the appropriate command, the user can load a specific value into an MCT such that upon resetting the printer, it will take on new functionality such as converting from a SBCS to DBCS and vice versa or converting a SBCS native 4610 to a SBCS model 4 emulation 4610 and vice versa.

Problem solved by this disclosure - the ability to use one microcode image in multiple printer models. This means that only one code image needs to be maintained in the field rather than one code image for each printer model.

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