Browse Prior Art Database

Inline Refresh Staleness Indicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013797D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The essence of this invention is to integrate status indicators as part of a visible refresh button system. Refresh controls are critical components for any network-oriented UI in which the data comes from a remote server or there are shared client users on a server. However, refresh controls and indicators today are typically very simplistic. Standard refresh controls in consoles such as Notes, IE, and Netscape Communicator are prominently surfaced as tool bar buttons, but are very basic, such as the one in Figure 1. Figure 1 Refresh toolbar button (Notes R5) One problem with such buttons is that they don't help to indicate when the displayed content should be updated. There is no integration of status within the controlling button. So, a scaled "staleness" indicator could be added to the refresh button. So, as the display becomes more in need of being updated the staleness indicator could become more pronounced. The level of staleness displayed via the indicator could directly let the user unobtrusively know when he or she might want to click the button to refresh the display. Here are three example states of such a refresh button:

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Inline Refresh Staleness Indicator

   The essence of this invention is to integrate status indicators as part of a visible refresh button system. Refresh controls are critical components for any network-oriented UI in which the data comes from a remote server or there are shared client users on a server. However, refresh controls and indicators today are typically very simplistic. Standard refresh controls in consoles such as Notes, IE, and Netscape Communicator are prominently surfaced as tool bar buttons, but are very basic, such as the one in Figure 1.

Figure 1 - Refresh toolbar button (Notes R5)

One problem with such buttons is that they don't help to indicate when the displayed content should be updated. There is no integration of status within the controlling button. So, a scaled "staleness" indicator could be added to the refresh button. So, as the display becomes more in need of being updated the staleness indicator could become more pronounced. The level of staleness displayed via the indicator could directly let the user unobtrusively know when he or she might want to click the button to refresh the display.

Here are three example states of such a refresh button:

Slightly stale (Figure 2) - Low amount of need to refresh (e.g., only 1 of 10 monitors have reset, only 3 of 2000 endpoints have been added, etc.) Moderately stale (Figure 3) - Moderate potential need to refresh Very stale (Figure 4) - High potential need to refresh (e.g., all monitor states shown...