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Updating Live HTML Pages Incrementally with Data from Web Servers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000013965D
Original Publication Date: 2000-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A method is disclosed for updating live HTML pages incrementally with data originating from a Web server. In browser-based Web applications, when a browser requests information from a Web server, the server builds an entire HTML page and sends it to the browser, which then renders the page. The previous HTML page is overwritten. The technique disclosed below allows for incremental updates to HTML pages that have already been served to the Web browser. The data used to update the pages originate from the Web server. Incremental updates to already-served HTML pages provide the following advantages: the need for sending unchanged data from the Web server to the browser is eliminated, data traffic on the wire is reduced since a page is sent once to the browser the user's interaction experience with the browser is enhanced: the time needed to update a page is reduced and updates to a page do not refresh the entire page. Live HTML pages that require frequent updates to a small amount of data are best suited to take advantage of this technique. The HTML page consists of two frames: a main frame and a receiver frame. The main frame is created without borders and contains the application's HTML elements. The receiver frame, is created without borders, occupying the minimum space allowed for frames, usually 1% of the browser window. Since the frames have no borders, the receiving frame is invisible to the user of the application. The receiver frame is initially blanked.

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Updating Live HTML Pages Incrementally with Data from Web Servers

A method is disclosed for updating live HTML pages incrementally with data originating from a Web server. In browser-based Web applications, when a browser requests information from a Web server, the server builds an entire HTML page and sends it to the browser, which then renders the page. The previous HTML page is overwritten. The technique disclosed below allows for incremental updates to HTML pages that have already been served to the Web browser. The data used to update the pages originate from the Web server.

Incremental updates to already-served HTML pages provide the following advantages: the need for sending unchanged data from the Web server to the browser is eliminated, data traffic on the wire is reduced since a page is sent once to the browser the user's interaction experience with the browser is enhanced: the time needed to update a page is reduced and updates to a page do not refresh the entire page.

Live HTML pages that require frequent updates to a small amount of data are best suited to take advantage of this technique.

The HTML page consists of two frames: a main frame and a receiver frame. The main frame is created without borders and contains the application's HTML elements. The receiver frame, is created without borders, occupying the minimum space allowed for frames, usually 1% of the browser window. Since the frames have no borders, the receiving frame is invisible to the us...