Browse Prior Art Database

SHIELD EDGE STABILIZATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014067D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Ferromagnetic shields used for giant magnetoresistive (GMR) heads can induce magnetic noise in the head due to undesired domain configuration in the shields. The undesired domain configurations are created in the shields by several mechanisms: improper selection of shield material; stress caused by the lapping process; or excitation during the writing process. Domains in the shields can be stabilized by use of shield magnetization pinning by placing high coercivity material at the shield edges. The shield magnetization is matched to the high coercivity material magnetization at the edges to stabilize or minimize the edge domain formation. Since shields usually are quite thick, a thick high coercivity material can be deposited by laminating 50A Cr/1000 A CoPtCr] x 20 to achieve 2 um thick shield. This lamination achieves high coercivity material and "Cr" layer suppresses formation of undesired microstructure. One possible way to deposit this high coercivity material is through a lift-off process.

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SHIELD EDGE STABILIZATION

   Ferromagnetic shields used for giant magnetoresistive (GMR) heads can induce
magnetic noise in the head due to undesired domain configuration in the shields.
The undesired domain configurations are created in the shields by several
mechanisms: improper selection of shield material; stress caused by the lapping
process; or excitation during the writing process. Domains in the shields can be
stabilized by use of shield magnetization pinning by placing high coercivity
material at the shield edges. The shield magnetization is matched to the high
coercivity material magnetization at the edges to stabilize or minimize the edge
domain formation. Since shields usually are quite thick, a thick high coercivity
material can be deposited by laminating ( 50A Cr/1000 A CoPtCr] x 20 to achieve
2 um thick shield. This lamination achieves high coercivity material and "Cr"
layer suppresses formation of undesired microstructure. One possible way to
deposit this high coercivity material is through a lift-off process.

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