Browse Prior Art Database

Apparatus to Limit Disk Pack Rotation During Shipping and Handling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014265D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greg Frees: AUTHOR

Abstract

Published is an apparatus to limit disk pack rotation in a disk drive during shipping and handling. Unwanted rotation of the disk pack during shipping and handling can result in damage to the ball bearings in the spindle. Damaged spindle bearings can result in increased track-misregistration (TMR) which can reduce data reliability and input/output (I/O) performance of the drive, increased acoustics from the drive, and decreased life/reliability of the spindle.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Apparatus to Limit Disk Pack Rotation During Shipping and Handling

   Published is an apparatus to limit disk pack rotation in a disk drive during shipping and handling. Unwanted rotation of the disk pack during shipping and handling can result in damage to the ball bearings in the spindle. Damaged spindle bearings can result in increased track-misregistration (TMR) which can reduce data reliability and input/output (I/O) performance of the drive, increased acoustics from the drive, and decreased life/reliability of the spindle.

   The disk pack can rotate on the spindle bearings during shipping and handling because of vibrations and accelerations that are imposed on the disk drive. In particular, the disk pack is relatively free to rotate in cases where the read-write heads/sliders are removed from the disk surfaces during non-operation (as is the case in some disk drives today). Normally the sliders provide a friction force that acts to restrain the pack if they are in contact with the disks during non-operation. It is therefore desirable to provide an apparatus to eliminate disk pack rotation in cases where there is not enough natural friction to restrain it during normal non-operational handling.

Fig.1
Fig. 2

Figure 1 schematically illustrates a solenoid mechanism that can be used to apply a "brake" to the disk pack when the file is non-operational. During non-operation, the spring applies a force to the "brake shoe" to bias it against the outer diameter (OD) of the...