Browse Prior Art Database

MOTHERBOARD WIRING METHOD TO OPTIMIZE USB CONTROLLER BANDWIDTH

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014479D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Resnick, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Motherboard Wiring method to optimize USB controller bandwidth This invention describes a method for wiring the Current PC motherboards use "south bridge" chips that have one USB (Universal Serial Bus) controller and 2 ports connected to that controller. The Intel PIIX4E* chip is an example of this. Over time the industry standard south bridge chips will contain 2 or more USB controllers each with 2 or more USB ports connected to each for a total of 4 or 5 USB ports per south bridge. USB ports can run at either low or high speeds and it is detrimental to system performance to have 2 high speed devices connected to one controller. The ideal configuration to optimize system performance is to have a mixture of low and high speed devices connected to a single controller. Current motherboards wire both ports that are connected to a single controller to one set of connectors. This invention uses a method of wiring the south bridge chip and its USB ports to the USB connectors on the motherboard so that customers will be naturally forced to plug a mixture of low and high speed devices on to a single controller and not multiple high speed devices on to a single controller. Figure: Current:

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 62% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

  MOTHERBOARD WIRING METHOD TO OPTIMIZE USB CONTROLLER BANDWIDTH

Motherboard Wiring method to optimize USB controller bandwidth

This invention describes a method for wiring the Current PC motherboards use "south bridge" chips that have one USB (Universal Serial Bus) controller and 2 ports connected to that controller. The Intel PIIX4E* chip is an example of this. Over time the industry standard south bridge chips will contain 2 or more USB controllers each with 2 or more USB ports connected to each for a total of 4 or 5 USB ports per south bridge. USB ports can run at either low or high speeds and it is detrimental to system performance to have 2 high speed devices connected to one controller. The ideal configuration to optimize system performance is to have a mixture of low and high speed devices connected to a single controller. Current motherboards wire both ports that are connected to a single controller to one set of connectors. This invention uses a method of wiring the south bridge chip and its USB ports to the USB connectors on the motherboard so that customers will be naturally forced to plug a mixture of low and high speed devices on to a single controller and not multiple high speed devices on to a single controller.

Figure:

Current:

Invention:

The current boards have the single controller wired to pair of stacked connectors next to the keyboard and mouse connectors. In the future we will use USB keyboards and mice. In a system with 2 USB

K

M

USB Control...