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Browse Prior Art Database

A method for generating unique and abstact patterns and images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014509D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Dec-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 3 page(s) / 678K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Unique, quasi-random patterns can be spontaneously generated in a variety of film samples during growth and/or processing. Images of these patterns have applications in fine arts, industrial design (wallpaper, fabrics, etc.), trademarks (as background logos), watermarks, signature arts, and encryption. Key advantages of images formed by such methods are that (i) the existence of the thin film sample provides proof of originality, i.e., that the image was not derived from an image owned by someone else, and (ii) a given sample or sample type can provide a family of visually related images that are recognizably different yet thematically related. The disclosed method for forming patterned images for the above-mentioned applications comprises the steps of: preparing a thin film sample having a quasi-random, spontaneously generated pattern identifying one or more sample areas to be imaged collecting the images.

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A method for generating unique and abstact patterns and images

Unique, quasi-random patterns can be spontaneously generated in a variety of film samples during growth and/or processing. Images of these patterns have applications in fine arts, industrial design (wallpaper, fabrics, etc.), trademarks (as background logos), watermarks, signature arts, and encryption.

Key advantages of images formed by such methods are that (i) the existence of the thin film sample provides proof of originality, i.e., that the image was not derived from an image owned by someone else, and (ii) a given sample or sample type can provide a family of visually related images that are recognizably different yet thematically related.

The disclosed method for forming patterned images for the above-mentioned applications comprises the steps of: - preparing a thin film sample having a quasi-random, spontaneously generated pattern - identifying one or more sample areas to be imaged
- collecting the images.

Images may be collected by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, or any other type of microscopy. Quasi-random, spontaneously-generated patterns may be produced by a variety of techniques including (i) crystallization processes, (ii) pressure-induced membrane fracture, and (iii) heteroepitaxial growth, where the patterned features arise from lattice-mismatch-induced defects. The crosshatch patterns in SiGe films grown on Si are an example of this last approach to pattern formation; typical conditions for obtaining the characteristic crosshatch would be to grow a SiGe step-graded buffer layer on <100> Si, where the SiGe layer has a final Ge composi...