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Magnetic Thermometry of Magnetoresistive Sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014543D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The temperature of a magnetoresistive sensor in series with non-magnetic leads is determined by measuring the maximum change (DR) in resistance with magnetic field. The maximum change is first measured at low current as a function of external temperature. The maximum change (DR) is a linear function of temperature and may then serve as a thermometer to determine the internal temperature of the magnetoresistive sensor at any higher current. The present method eliminates the contribution from the non-magnetic leads, which typically have different thermal coefficients of resistance and can confuse the measurement of the sensor's temperature. The temperature of a sensor must be measured accurately in order to set the bias current limit and thus the maximum amplitude of the sensor. Figure 1 shows that the maximum change (DR) in resistance is linear with temperature. Each color represents a different sensor. Figure 2 shows that the maximum change (DR) in resistance is also linear with the input power for the same sensors. 1

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Magnetic Thermometry of Magnetoresistive Sensors

    The temperature of a magnetoresistive sensor in series with non-magnetic leads is determined by measuring the maximum change (DR) in resistance with magnetic field. The maximum change is first measured at low current as a function of external temperature. The maximum change (DR) is a linear function of temperature and may then serve as a thermometer to determine the internal temperature of the magnetoresistive sensor at any higher current. The present method eliminates the contribution from the non-magnetic leads, which typically have different thermal coefficients of resistance and can confuse the measurement of the sensor's temperature. The temperature of a sensor must be measured accurately in order to set the bias current limit and thus the maximum amplitude of the sensor.

    Figure 1 shows that the maximum change (DR) in resistance is linear with temperature. Each color represents a different sensor.

    Figure 2 shows that the maximum change (DR) in resistance is also linear with the input power for the same sensors.

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