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Device-independent method for grouping printer alerts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014606D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for grouping printer alerts independently of printer model or manufacturer, thereby simplifying the task of selecting alerts for notification. Printer administrators are responsible for responding to problems with printers such as a tray out of paper or toner low. Printer management software reports these problems by various mechanisms such as color changes to printer icons, audible cues, or generation of e-mail messages. Since printers vary in their importance to the administrator, and since not all problems need to be reported, management software can provide mechanisms for selecting which problems are to be reported for which printers. Selection of the types of problems to report is complicated by two factors: printers typically can generate alerts related to many problems, often numbering in the hundreds; and each printer family typically has a unique set of alerts. To choose specific alerts for each printer is a cumbersome task. The invention provides a method for grouping printer alerts according to the training level and the alert code from the printer Management Information Base (MIB) defined in Request for Comment (RFC) 1759 . Since these fields in the MIB are independent of printer model and manufacturer, the groupings can be used for any printer that is RFC 1759-compliant.

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Device-independent method for grouping printer alerts

   Disclosed is a method for grouping printer alerts independently of printer
model or manufacturer, thereby simplifying the task of selecting alerts for
notification.

Printer administrators are responsible for responding to problems with printers
such as a tray out of paper or toner low. Printer management software reports
these problems by various mechanisms such as color changes to printer icons,
audible cues, or generation of e-mail messages. Since printers vary in their
importance to the administrator, and since not all problems need to be reported,
management software can provide mechanisms for selecting which problems are to be
reported for which printers.

Selection of the types of problems to report is complicated by two factors:
printers typically can generate alerts related to many problems, often numbering
in the hundreds; and each printer family typically has a unique set of alerts.
To choose specific alerts for each printer is a cumbersome task.

The invention provides a method for grouping printer alerts according to the
training level and the alert code from the printer Management Information Base
(MIB) defined in Request for Comment (RFC) 1759 . Since these fields in the MIB
are independent of printer model and manufacturer, the groupings can be used for
any printer that is RFC 1759-compliant.

Alerts are mapped to groups according to alert code for most common alert types
such as paper jam, cover open, and offline...