Browse Prior Art Database

Improved Computer Mice

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014661D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Computer mice are a widely accepted means of providing user input to personal computers and laptops. Motion of the body of the mouse can be used to move a cursor displayed on the screen of the computer. The mouse may have one or more buttons for clicking on and thus selecting items indicated by the cursor. As shown in Figure 1, today's computer mouse 100 can have a left mouse button 101 and a right mouse button 102. This mouse can also have a scroll dial or disk 103 to assist in scrolling through long documents. The body of such a mouse is free to move in the X-Y plane. The scroll dial rotates about an axis of rotation which is the left-right or X-axis. Today, the speed of scrolling is controlled by the speed at which one's forefinger turns the dial 103. We wish to show alternate embodiments of a mouse with a scroll feature, Figures 2-4. In Figure 2, mouse 200 has left mouse button 201 and right mouse button 202. This mouse has a scroll cylinder 203 which has a diamond quadrilateral shape. Because the outer radius of this scroll cylinder is not fixed, the speed of the scrolling can be varied by physically placing the user's forefinger at different positions along the X-axis of the cylinder. For a given stroke-displacement in the Y-direction by the forefinger, or other appendage, the rotational displacement of the cylinder will be greater as the finger is moved towards the outer ends of the scroll cylinder, where the exterior radius is smaller. Thus, the sensitivity of the scroll cylinder is increased by moving the finger to an outer edge of scroll cylinder 203. If a lower sensitivity is desired, the finger would be placed near or at the center of the scroll cylinder 203, where the exterior radius is the largest. The mathematics of our invention is that the angular displacement of the scroll cylinder about the X-axis is equal to the stroke linear-displacement of the finger in the Y-direction, divided by the radius of the scroll cylinder where the finger is placed. It is the angular displacement of the scroll cylinder which is measured by the mouse. Thus, the sensitivity of the scrolling through a long document can be controlled by varying the finger position along the axis of rotation of the cylinder, without need of electronically changing the sensitivity of this scrolling in the desktop icon of the personal computer or laptop.

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Improved Computer Mice

Computer mice are a widely accepted means of providing user input to personal computers and laptops. Motion of the body of the mouse can be used to move a cursor displayed on the screen of the computer. The mouse may have one or more buttons for clicking on and thus selecting items indicated by the cursor.

As shown in Figure 1, today's computer mouse 100 can have a left mouse button 101 and a right mouse button 102. This mouse can also have a scroll dial or disk 103 to assist in scrolling through long documents. The body of such a mouse is free to move in the X-Y plane. The scroll dial rotates about an axis of rotation which is the left-right or X-axis. Today, the speed of scrolling is controlled by the speed at which one's forefinger turns the dial 103.

We wish to show alternate embodiments of a mouse with a scroll feature, Figures 2-4. In Figure 2, mouse 200 has left mouse button 201 and right mouse button 202. This mouse has a scroll cylinder 203 which has a diamond quadrilateral shape. Because the outer radius of this scroll cylinder is not fixed, the speed of the scrolling can be varied by physically placing the user's forefinger at different positions along the X-axis of the cylinder. For a given stroke-displacement in the Y-direction by the forefinger, or other appendage, the rotational displacement of the cylinder will be greater as the finger is moved towards the outer ends of the scroll cylinder, where the exterior radius is smaller. Thus, the sensitivity of the scroll cylinder is increased by moving the finger to an outer edge of scroll cylinder 203. If a lower sensitivity is desired, the finger would be placed near or at the center of the scroll cylinder 203, where the exterior radius is the largest.

The mathematics of our invention is that the angular displacement of the scroll cylinder about the X-axis is equal to the stroke linear-displacement of the finger in the Y-direction, divided by the radius of the scroll cylinder where the finger is placed. It is the angular displacement of the scroll cylinder which is measured by the mouse. Thus, the sensitivity of the scrolling...