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Method to internationalize fields on a web page via the use of sounds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014785D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This disclosure proposes a method to aid sight-impared and international users of the World Wide Web with the use of web pages. As the use of the web grows, the number of non-English web pages is starting to grow at a very fast rate. To handle the increased traffic and requirements of non-English speaking visitors to web sites, some of the major sites offer alternative web pages which hold translated copies of the original English site. However, some web sites do not have the bandwidth to offer alternative language web sites. Designing and changing a web site, to keep the content fresh, is often a laborous and time-consuming task. On top of this task, if the web master must then translate their changed pages to Italian or French, then the work load is multiplied in complexity. Thus some sites, in order not to lose customer traffic, keep their web sites as stagnant as possible in order to reduce re-translation costs for page changes. Another method is for a site owner to decide that they will work with a fixed language and it is up to the e-commerce visitor to figure out how to purchase something on the web. Typically, the United States leads the world in e-commerce sites. Thus, a majority of the e-commerce sites are written and processed in English. However, this is becoming a problem as other countries vie for business and demand equality in the content of web pages. And, there will most certainly be a case were a desired item that a US customer is shopping for is only found on a non-English web site. And too, their web master decides it is not cost effective for them to translate their e-commerce site to English. The proposed solution is a set of free, industry standardized sound files which can be embedded into web pages. As a mouse pointer passes over a representing icon for that sound file, the actual representation sound is played. For instance, a picture of a cash register is the icon for the sound of a sales "ring" of a cash register. In a given example: A user decides to shop for a well known leather briefcase. The user finds that he or she can buy from the manufacturer directly from their web site. When the customer visits the web site, they find that the web site is written entirely in Italian. However, the search engine allows the English speaking visitor to find their item by the item's model name, which is already an Italian word. Once found, the web site shows the user a picture of the briefcase. Next to the picture is the price of the briefcase in Italian Lire, which the user can translate to American dollars simply with a calculator. Next to the price is a picture of a shopping cart, and the words "Purchase" underneath, but in Italian. When the user clicks on the shopping cart or puts their mouse pointer over that icon, there is a sound of an item being placed into a cart. Or a confirmation "ding" is completed to let the user know a successful selection occured. The user continues on through their shopping experience until they arrive at the web site's checkout. There, they find different icons and sounds which tell them what type of information the web site needs them to enter in order for the transaction to continue. And, this is finally completed with the click and chime of the cash register icon. 1

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Method to internationalize fields on a web page via the use of sounds

This disclosure proposes a method to aid sight-impared and international users of the World Wide Web with the use of web pages. As the use of the web grows, the number of non-English web pages is starting to grow at a very fast rate. To handle the increased traffic and requirements of non-English speaking visitors to web sites, some of the major sites offer alternative web pages which hold translated copies of the original English site. However, some web sites do not have the bandwidth to offer alternative language web sites. Designing and changing a web site, to keep the content fresh, is often a laborous and time-consuming task. On top of this task, if the web master must then translate their changed pages to Italian or French, then the work load is multiplied in complexity. Thus some sites, in order not to lose customer traffic, keep their web sites as stagnant as possible in order to reduce re-translation costs for page changes.

Another method is for a site owner to decide that they will work with a fixed language and it is up to the e-commerce visitor to figure out how to purchase something on the web. Typically, the United States leads the world in e-commerce sites. Thus, a majority of the e-commerce sites are written and processed in English. However, this is becoming a problem as other countries vie for business and demand equality in the content of web pages. And, there will most certainly be a case were a desired item that a US customer is shopping for is only found on a non-English web site. And too, their web master decides it is not cost effective for them to translate their e-commerce site to English.

The proposed solution is a set of free, industry standardized sound files which can be embedded into web pages. As a mouse pointer passes over a representing icon for that sound file, the actual representation sound is played. For instance, a picture of a cash register is the icon for the sound of a sales "ring" of a cash register. In a given example: A user decides to shop for a well known leather briefcase. The user finds that he or she can buy from the manufacturer directly from their web site. When the customer vis...