Browse Prior Art Database

Determining Total Time Per Area for the Life of a Defect

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014804D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

There was a need to determine how long it was taking to get defects fixed. This tool takes the history information from the text of a CMVC defect and uses it to determine how long it took to fix the defect. It separates the calculated times by area (test, development, build) and gives information by defect and an average for a list of defects. The list of defects can be obtained by inputting a list of defect numbers into the tool or by entering a CMVC query. The tool then retrieves the information for the defects from CMVC and calculates the Turn Around Time (TAT) for each defect by area. The results for each defect are then averaged and presented in HTML table form by defect severity (1, 2, 3, 4) and priority (high, medium, low, mustfix). Before this tool was written there was no way to determine this information except by manually calculating this information, which is not feasible for a large sample of defects. 1

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Determining Total Time Per Area for the Life of a Defect

  There was a need to determine how long it was taking to get defects fixed. This tool takes the history information from the text of a CMVC defect and uses it to determine how long it took to fix the defect. It separates the calculated times by area (test, development, build) and gives information by defect and an average for a list of defects. The list of defects can be obtained by inputting a list of defect numbers into the tool or by entering a CMVC query. The tool then retrieves the information for the defects from CMVC and calculates the Turn Around Time (TAT) for each defect by area. The results for each defect are then averaged and presented in HTML table form by defect severity (1, 2, 3, 4) and priority (high, medium, low, mustfix). Before this tool was written there was no way to determine this information except by manually calculating this information, which is not feasible for a large sample of defects.

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