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Browse Prior Art Database

Asset Information by System Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014818D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a design to tie asset information to a system unit (or computer). Tying asset information to the system unit eliminates manual configuration errors by maintenance personnel when system boards (often called mother boards) are replaced in the field. Furthermore, when many different system unit types share the same BIOS code, it is beneficial as a means to ensure the correct system personality is maintained after a Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) update without manual configuration. The asset information can be tied to the system unit by making it a pluggable part which connects directly into the system board. This pluggable part can then be easily moved to the new system board when it is replaced. New system board Field Replaceable Units (FRU)s would not include the pluggable part. The pluggable part would be a separate FRU for each system unit type which would be factory programmed to default settings for that system unit type. When system boards are replaced in system units in the field by maintenance personnel, personality information is often not updated because either the maintenance person forgets, or does not follow the maintenance procedure. Personality information entails, but is not limited to: System unit type and model number System unit serial number Universal Unique Identifier (UUID) Boot Sequence Administrator and power on passwords BIOS logos, and supported functions

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Asset Information by System Unit

Disclosed is a design to tie asset information to a system unit (or computer). Tying asset information to the system unit eliminates manual configuration errors by maintenance personnel when system boards (often called mother boards) are replaced in the field. Furthermore, when many different system unit types share the same BIOS code, it is beneficial as a means to ensure the correct system personality is maintained after a Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) update without manual configuration.

The asset information can be tied to the system unit by making it a pluggable part which connects directly into the system board. This pluggable part can then be easily moved to the new system board when it is replaced. New system board Field Replaceable Units (FRU)s would not include the pluggable part. The pluggable part would be a separate FRU for each system unit type which would be factory programmed to default settings for that system unit type.

When system boards are replaced in system units in the field by maintenance personnel, personality information is often not updated because either the maintenance person forgets, or does not follow the maintenance procedure. Personality information entails, but is not limited to:

System unit type and model number System unit serial number Universal Unique Identifier (UUID) Boot Sequence Administrator and power on passwords BIOS logos, and supported functions

System board replacement causes the system administrator additional work to reinstate the administrator password, and set the boot sequence and other BIOS settings back to the way they were. Also, any systems management software will not report proper information if the maintenance person does not update the machine type/model/serial number/UUID information. Therefore, configuration errors, end-user down time, and work effort for the administrator and maintenance personnel are reduced by eliminating the need for the personality to get re-instated manually.

A separate asset part is also useful when the same BIOS image is to be shared with more than one system unit. There are many instances when this may occur. For example:

The same system board FRU may be used in several systems unit models that are differentiated by minor hardware

differences, such plug-in options to provide different number of Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus slots, Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) versus Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE), high-end desktop versus low-end server, tower versus desktop. A different system board FRU with minor hardware differences such as number of PCI slots, SCSI onboard versus IDE,

Ethernet onboard, number of Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. Same system board, but for different OEM re-sellers. This may entail different logos during boot time, slightly different BIOS

function, or configuration options.

Using the pluggable part to store the personality ensures that during either a system boar...