Browse Prior Art Database

Mechanism for Supplemental Metadata Lists

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014932D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism for conveniently creating lists whose elements have already been defined in other lists. It is often convenient to define lists of items that may be used by programs in various ways. For example, a user interface may be defined in terms of lists of screens, and those screens may be defined in terms of lists of screen elements. One way to define these lists is to create a notation for defining individual elements, and then to define lists simply by defining the elements they contain. For example, a menu item is uniquely identified by an ID, a name and a processing class as shown below: MENU Edit LIST 100: <100001, “Cut”> <100002,”Copy”> <100003,”Paste”> A problem occurs when an element needs to be contained in multiple lists. Redefining the repeating element may lead to error or ambiguity if the definitions are not identical, and will lead to redundancy if the definitions are identical. This problem is solved using supplemental lists.

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Mechanism for Supplemental Metadata Lists

Disclosed is a mechanism for conveniently creating lists whose elements have already been defined in other lists.

It is often convenient to define lists of items that may be used by programs in various ways. For example, a user interface may be defined in terms of lists of screens, and those screens may be defined in terms of lists of screen elements. One way to define these lists is to create a notation for defining individual elements, and then to define lists simply by defining the elements they contain. For example, a menu item is uniquely identified by an ID, a name and a processing class as shown below:

MENU Edit LIST 100: <100001, "Cut"> <100002,"Copy"> <100003,"Paste">

A problem occurs when an element needs to be contained in multiple lists. Redefining the repeating element may lead to error or ambiguity if the definitions are not identical, and will lead to redundancy if the definitions are identical. This problem is solved using supplemental lists.

A supplemental list is defined as initially empty. When elements are defined that appear in multiple lists, the supplemental lists are listed after the definition. For example:

MENU Xedit LIST 200: MENU PasteIt LIST 201:

MENU Edit LIST 100000: <100001, "Cut"> 200 <100002,"Copy"> 200 <100003,"Paste"> 200, 201

The Xedit and Edit lists now both contain elements 100001 through 100003. The PasteIt list contains element 100003.

Also disclosed here is a specific implementati...