Browse Prior Art Database

Stand Alone Method to Configure a Scanning Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000014999D
Original Publication Date: 2002-May-08
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2003-Jun-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A computer printer today must be able to adapt to many possible configurations. For example, a manufacturer producing a printer may want to broaden his market by creating several versions of the printer, each capable of communicating with the host computer through a different I/O (Input/Output) standard. While the main logic portion of each printer is the same, the interface may be changed for each different version. This produces a requirement that the common logic portion of the printer be configurable to its applied I/O standard. In a normal printer this would be done at the factory or in the field with DIP switches on the board or special firmware downloads. While I/O configuration is a good example, this configuration problem may be extended to any number of settings for which the printer needs. With the addition of the page scanning feature to the printer, another method of inputting important configuration information is created.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Stand Alone Method to Configure a Scanning Printer

   A computer printer today must be able to adapt to many possible configurations. For example, a manufacturer producing a printer may want to broaden his market by creating several versions of the printer, each capable of communicating with the host computer through a different I/O (Input/Output) standard. While the main logic portion of each printer is the same, the interface may be changed for each different version. This produces a requirement that the common logic portion of the printer be configurable to its applied I/O standard. In a normal printer this would be done at the factory or in the field with DIP switches on the board or special firmware downloads. While I/O configuration is a good example, this configuration problem may be extended to any number of settings for which the printer needs. With the addition of the page scanning feature to the printer, another method of inputting important configuration information is created.

   While in set up mode, the printer will print the present configuration of the printer and a verity of bar codes or special patterns representing other possible configurations of the printer. The user would cut , tear out, or mark the bar code or pattern representing the desired printer configuration and then scan it with the printer's scanner. Scanning the bar code or special pattern will set the configuration of the printer. By using scanned configuration settings, the factory or service person can configure the printer without having to access DIP switches or modify the firmware on the control board.

   This provides a stand alone, interactive method for setting up the printe...